Example chronometric dating technique

This method is based on the assumption (which nearly always holds true) that deeper layers of rock were deposited earlier in Earth's history, and thus are older than more shallow layers.

The successive layers of rock represent successive intervals of time.

The most frequently applied dating methods, such as the potassium–argon, the uranium series, the fission track, the luminescence, the electron spin resonance, and radiocarbon techniques, are described.Archaeologists use many different techniques to determine the age of a particular artifact, site, or part of a site.Two broad categories of dating or chronometric techniques that archaeologists use are called relative and absolute dating.Before the advent of absolute dating methods in the twentieth century, nearly all dating was relative.The main relative dating method is stratigraphy (pronounced stra-TI-gra-fee), which is the study of layers of rocks or the objects embedded within those layers.

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